|Video| Alex Zanardi is more than a champion…

TOUCH THE SKY from tim hahne on Vimeo.

Alex Zanardi is such a champion, who is much more than just from his racing.

Sure, he’s raced in Formula 1. He’s won the CART series title two years in a row. He’s raced touring cars and won the gold medal in the 2012 Paralympic Games after losing his legs in a horrible crash in 2001. Still, Zanardi is much more than that.
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|24 Hours of LeMons| On Track in the Hudson Hornet


Here is some in car footage from the Chase Race 1952 Hudson Hornet competing in the 24 Hours of LeMons event held at The Ridge Motorsports Park on July 20 and 21, 2013. This car is incredibly fun to drive and was very warmly received by the LeMons judges and competitors. Later in the week I’ll have a more detailed post, with pictures and more videos.

Long story short: we won! The Hudson won the top prize in LeMons, the Index of Effluency.

|Technique| Mental tips to drive faster: Breathe

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You don’t need to be Lewis Hamilton in order to get faster.

Amateur racers can improve themselves if they practice a little bit each day. There are simple things that drivers can do to improve their racing that only take 15 to 30 minutes per day, and cost you very little. The sweet thing is that a lot drivers aren’t even attempting to do many of these little things during their ‘downtime’. That gives you an advantage.

You’ve got 30 minutes today, right? Then you can start becoming faster.

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|Technique| Your body might be causing you to lose time…


Last week, I  wrote about the negative effects on driving when over-stressing one area of the body. Now what happens after the entire body has been stressed?

Another thinking has emerged, using the tensegrity model, that your body’s fascia plays a large role in determining your posture and structure. Fascia is the connective tissue that makes up nearly 60% of the muscle. It also encases and suspends the muscles and bones of the body.

Fascia is plastic in nature, which means that it cannot change its structure quickly like muscles that contract and relax – rather it adapts and grows around the structures and strains placed on the body.

So what does that means in terms of racing?
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